Everyday Solutions for Everyday Business

Geospatial technology is an umbrella term used to describe the disciplines of surveying, mapping, remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the data management systems used to process all of the information. Geospatial technology is no longer restricted to the world of high-tech firms. Once a tool that was affordable only to the largest organizations, geospatial systems have become cost-effective options for even the smallest organizations. The geospatial technology industry is developing products and services that impact our everyday lives and businesses. In fact, some of the industries that benefit the most are the ones you may least expect:

  • Bankers
  • Farmers
  • Real Estate
  • Marketing Firms
  • Utility Companies
  • Telecommunications Companies
  • Government Agencies
  • Cities and Counties
  • Economic Development Groups
  • Police
  • First Responders
  • Homeland Security Organizations
  • Foresters
  • Fishermen
  • Transportation Planners
  • Educators
  • Airports
  • Public Health Officials
  • Media
  • Weather Services

How is it used?

  • Gas and electric utilities use it to model distribution networks, issue work orders, dispatch service crews, market to prospective customers and plan service expansions.
  • Realtors compare multiple properties and their respective proximity to desired amenities such as schools, parks, and shopping centers.
  • First responders mitigate floods, fires, hazardous material spills with real-time lifesaving information.
  • Banks and insurance companies are able to target their best prospects and more accurately focus marketing and advertising resources.
  • Telecommunications companies find it invaluable as they seek a competitive edge in the management of outside plant facilities and in the marketing of long distance services.
  • Law firms use imagery to help clients regain property in land disputes.
  • Government agencies rely on this technology to plan new land developments, determine tax valuations, manage public works networks, route emergency vehicles, analyze crime and accident patterns, manage transportation systems and study environmental issues.
  • Casinos manage and track their fleets of busses and limos.
  • Media organizations use geospatial technology to more effectively report the news and put it in context for readers.
  • Private companies use geospatial information to make more informed decisions in areas ranging from site selection, to marketing demographics, to analyzing competition.
  • Law enforcement conducts information gathering and surveillance to combat drug activity.
  • Cities are using geospatial technologies for applications as diverse as routing sanitation and emergency vehicles, replacing water mains and planning alternative traffic patterns.
  • Foresters manage clear cutting, thinning and weather damage.
  • Commercial Developers optimize site selection and show properties in context of potential customers/tenants, nearness to competitors, access to labor pools and potential risk factors.